Renovated Rocky Mountain High! John Denver’s Former Estate Is Listed for $11M

istock/Gijsbert Hanekroot

John Denver’s newly renovated Rocky Mountain paradise is back on the market for $11 million, according to the Denver Post. The performer, who died in 1997, left behind a legacy of both music and real estate.

This multimillion-dollar Aspen, CO, mansion on 2.6 acres inspired the iconic songwriter to write “Starwood in Aspen.”

It’s easy to see why. Located in the exclusive Starwood neighborhood, high in the mountains, it really does have the Rocky Mountain views that would inspire you to break into song. Denver built the home in 1972, and “it became his legacy and refuge,” according to the listing.

The property first came on the market in August 2014 for $10.75 million. By October 2016, the price had fallen to $3.3 million. The current owners picked it up for a relative song—$2.75 million—in December 2016.

Entrance to John Denver’s former estate realtor.com
Open living space realtor.com
Sitting area realtor.com
Dining space realtor.com
Kitchen with vaulted ceiling realtor.com
Master suite realtor.com
Rec room with billiard table and media space realtor.com

The couple renovated and modernized the 7,735-square-foot home while retaining some vintage features, including the wood-burning fireplaces and stained-glass windows. Updates include a new roof, electrical and plumbing, and new windows and flooring. The layout now features five bedrooms, five bathrooms, and two half-baths.

The kitchen now has a vaulted ceiling, and the open layout features windows affording views of the scenic mountains. The kitchen is adjacent to the spacious living and dining areas. There’s also a rec room with a billiard table and media area, and three wet bars and a workout room. Outside, the home is surrounded by multiple decks with jaw-dropping views.

Denver sold about 33 million records, and his song “Rocky Mountain High” was adopted as one of Colorado’s two state songs. The state also named him as its poet laureate in 1974. Denver died when the experimental plane he was piloting crashed off the coast of California in 1997. He was 53.

The Bineau Team with Coldwell Banker Mason Morse-Aspen holds the listing.

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